About Project

Copyright@Susan Bittker
Copyright@Susan Bittker

The project aims to make 140,000 paper cranes to feel the devastating effect the first anomic bomb dropped in Hiroshima on 6 August 1945 had. It killed 140,000 citizens by the end of the year. Folding paper cranes for peace was after the story of Sadako, a Japanese girl who was just two years old when the atom bomb was dropped in Hiroshima. Sadako developed leukemia when she reached 10 and while in hospital heard the legend that anyone who folded 1000 paper cranes would have their wish granted. While doing the second round Sadako died aged 12. A statue of Sadako holding a golden crane is in the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park. At the foot of the statue is a plaque that reads: "This is our cry. This is our prayer. Peace in the world."
The City of Hiroshima website explains Sadako's story in detail. Please visit here and here.Child Peace 

Who has started the project?

Copyright@Susan Bittker
Copyright@Susan Bittker

I am Atsuko, Japanese living in Edinburgh for around 18 years. I obtained a PhD in history at the University of Edinburgh and am currently a part-time student at the same university. I was always wondering why Japan experienced two atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. When I was a teenager I visited Nagasaki in my school trip. We learnt stories of Nagasaki atomic bomb victims. My feeling was simply against war and no more Nagasaki and Hiroshima. After that I gradually learnt Japanese armies committed atrocities in other parts of Asia during the World War II. I also met people who congratulated the atomic bombs dropped in Japan. Wars divide people and  Japanese were dehumanised. Without dehumanisation, such a devastating bomb would not have been utilised. Depending on the political context, any group could be victimised. We can get rid of nuclear weapons if we can get rid of wars and discriminations.               

Now part of Edinburgh Peace & Justice Centre

Since June 2016 this project has become a project run by the Edinburgh Peace & Justice Centre where regular Saturday workshop has been held. The centre has been campaigning against nuclear weapons for a long time, alongside other issues such as human right.